UK commits $88 million to LBNF/DUNE

Jo Johnson (UK Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation) and Judith G. Garber (U.S. Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs) signed the U.S.-UK Science and Technology Agreement on Sept. 20 in Washington, D.C. (Credit: FCO)

Excerpted from Fermilab’s article UK commits $88 million to LBNF/DUNE in first-ever umbrella science agreement with U.S. (20 September 2017).

Joint statement by the governments of the United States of America and United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on the U.S.-U.K. Science and Technology Agreement

U.S. Acting Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs Judith G. Garber and UK Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation Jo Johnson signed the U.S.-UK Science and Technology Agreement on Sept. 20 in Washington, D.C. The signing ceremony marks the first ever umbrella agreement between the United States and United Kingdom outlining a commitment to collaborate on world-class science and innovation.

The first major project of the agreement is UK investment in LBNF and DUNE, for which the UK government has confirmed approximately $88 million in funding. Construction for LBNF/DUNE is expected to create an estimated 4,000 jobs in the United States, about 2,000 in South Dakota and 2,000 in Illinois. The $88 million in funding makes the UK the largest country investor in the project outside of the United States.

The UK is a major scientific contributor to the DUNE collaboration, with 14 UK universities and two Science and Technology Facilities Council laboratories providing essential expertise and components to the experiment and facility. UK involvement in the project will also provide opportunities for UK industry to build capability in new and developing technologies, for example, in precision engineering, cryogenics and accelerator-based applications.

The investment in LBNF/DUNE is the most recent example from a long history of collaboration in industries ranging from aerospace to robotics to agriculture. U.S.-UK cooperation on science and innovation benefits both nations by sharing expertise to enhance our understanding of many important topics that have the potential to be world-changing, helping maintain our position as global leaders in research for years to come.

Read full article. 

Also see articles at the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council website (20 September) and theconversation.com (by Stefan Söldner-Rembold, 25 September).